This report, the third in a series, provides obesity rates for the nation, states and communities as measured by the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index®. The Well-Being Index includes 2.2 million surveys, captures how people feel about and experience their daily lives, and measures well-being across five elements — purpose, social, financial, community and physical. Levels of well-being correlate with healthcare utilization and cost, and productivity measures such as absenteeism, presenteeism and job performance; all critical to organizational and economic competitiveness.
This report, part of the Gallup-Healthways State of American Well-Being series, examines the active living environment within 48 medium- to large-size metro communities across the U.S. and the associated impact on various aspects of residents’ well-being. Our research shows that active living environments—those communities that invest in bike paths, parks, walkability and public transit—have residents who have better outcomes in key aspects of well-being. Across the communities that we studied nationwide, residents in the five highest active living communities have, on average, significantly lower rates of smoking, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and depression; and significantly higher rates of exercise, healthy eating, fresh produce consumption, and those thriving in physical well-being as compared to residents in communities with low activeliving infrastructure.
This report, part of the Gallup-Healthways State of American Well-Being series, examines the incidence of diabetes in 190 communities nationwide and across all 50 states. The overall incidence of diabetes in the U.S. adult population is growing, up from 10.6% in 2008 to 11.5% in 2016. The rate increase has resulted in about 2.2 million more Americans with diabetes since 2008. Even more alarming is that obesity, a key risk factor in the development of type 2 diabetes, has climbed by almost 3 points since 2008, to reach 28.3% nationally in 2016.
This report, the seventh in a series, measures the incidence of heart attack across the country, comparing states as well as the relationship of heart attack to other key well-being items. Our research asks people whether they have had a heart attack in their lifetime. As part of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index®, chronic conditions such as heart attack, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and depression have been measured on a daily basis since 2008. These items comprise a portion of physical well-being, which captures whether people have good health and enough energy to get things done each day. Physical is one of five elements of well-being, along with purpose, social, financial and community.
This report, part of the Gallup-Healthways State of American Well-Being series, examines the incidence of residents who have survived a heart attack in 190 communities nationwideand analyzes the impact of heart disease on important health and productivity outcomes.
The ability to understand the well-being of populations helps community leaders and population health stakeholders gauge prosperity and progress and can shine light onwhere investments can be made to improve and transform environments to foster high well-being. High well-being communities have citizens who are thriving across manyaspects of their lives, who are optimistic about their future, and collectively who are more productive, perform better, and have better health and lower healthcare costs.This special report, a collaboration between Gallup, Healthways and Health eVillages, a program founded by Donato Tramuto in partnership with the not-for-profit Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights organization and Aptus Health, presents insights gathered through the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index®.
The Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index is a barometerof Americans’ perceptions of their well-being. Thenational, annual well-being score is unique because whileit is affected to some extent by national events, suchas economic fluctuations or natural occurrences, it alsoaccurately captures a more nuanced picture of the stateof our nation across the factors impacting our daily lives. Six domains of well-being comprise the national Well-Being Index, including life evaluation, emotional health, work environment, physical health, healthy behaviors, and basic access. Over the six years of our well-being measurement, Americans’ life evaluations have improved, emotional health and healthy behaviors have remained stable, and basic access, physical health, and work environment have declined.
The Gallup-Healthways Global Well-Being Index (Global Well-Being Index) is a global barometer of individuals’perceptions of their own well-being — those aspects that define how we think about and experience our daily lives. Well-being has been shown to correlate with metrics such as productivity and healthcare costs. The 10 questions that comprise the Global Well-Being Index and were fielded as part of the 2013 Gallup World Poll allow for comparisons of element-level well-being at the individual, social network, organizational (e.g., employer, health plan, patient population), city, state, country, and global levels. The index includes five elements of well-being purpose, social, financial, community, and physical. In this report, we categorize well-being results from the Global Well-Being Index as thriving, struggling, or suffering for each element, based on participants’ responses.
This report, the fifth in a series, examines the comparative well-being of Americans ages 55 and older. Nationally, older Americans have higher well-being compared to younger adults, and our research reveals that well-being gets better with age. People 75 and older have even higher well-being than those 65 to 74, and they outscore their younger counterparts by a sizable margin.
This page offers infographics related to the well-being rank of each US state.
The Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index® includes more than 2.1 million surveys and captures how people feel about and experience their daily lives. Levels of well-being correlate with healthcare (utilization and cost) and productivity measures (absenteeism, presenteeism, and job performance), all critical to organizational and economic competitiveness.
This report, the sixth in a series, measures the financial well-being of Americans. Financial well-being is one of the five interrelated elements of well-being in the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index® — along with purpose, social, community and physical elements. It is not solely an indicator of income, but captures individuals’ abilities to manage their economic life to reduce stress and increase security.
The Gallup-Healthways State of Global Well-Being 2014 Country Well-Being Rankings report provides an overview of global citizens’ well-being as measured by the Gallup-Healthways Global Well-Being Index. In 2014, our research includes more than 146,000 surveys in 145 countries and areas, and captures how people feel about and experience their daily lives. Our research shows that people with higher well-being have higher productivity, lower healthcare costs, are more resilient in the face of challenges and are more likely to contribute to the success of their organizations and communities.
Here are a bunch of words. Healthy Ashville is dedicated to making Savannah a healthier place to live. Our aim is to increase opportunities for citizens to engage in physical activity and consume a nutritious, balanced diet. During the summer of 2007, Savannah Mayor Otis Johnson launched the Healthy Savannah Initiative, with the aim of making Savannah a healthier place to live. Healthy Ashville is dedicated to making Savannah a healthier place to live.
This report, part of Gallup-Healthways State of American Well-Being series, examines the well-being of Americans ages 55 and older. Nationally, older Americans have significantlyhigher well-being as compared to their younger counterparts – with older Americans achieving a Well-Being Index score of 63.6 in 2015, 3 points higher than those under 55.