As a companion to the online course titled Partnering4Health: Approaches to Sustaining Healthy Communities, SOPHE has developed a toolkit to provide guidance and resources for those who seek to carry out the sustainability activities described in the course. Whereas the online course provides guidance about the steps that can be taken to ensure sustainability, the toolkit provides the tools and resources that can help public health professionals and educators, community-based organizations, and community members who are passionate about improving the health of their communities to take those steps toward sustaining healthy communities.
This toolkit was developed for a broad continuum of public health care organizations and treatment facilities, particularly those organizations serving persons with mental illnesses and addictions. The materials are intended for administrators, direct providers, and support staff of organizations considering or implementing tobacco-free policies.
ChangeLab Solutions developed the easy-to-use Tobacco Retailer Licensing Playbook to outline the ten strategies necessary for developing, implementing, and enforcing a comprehensive TRL policy. It provides all the steps and considerations involved in building support for TRL, and includes examples and key resources to help communities create a strong local policy that improves public health.
Free, online interactive presentation on electronic nicotine delivery systems and their potential health effects during and after pregnancy, and discusses effective tobacco cessation treatments. This presentation is a new module for Smoking Cessation for Pregnancy and Beyond A Virtual Clinic, an online training designed for health professionals to effectively assist women in quitting smoking. The training is eligible for free continuing education and Maintenance of Certification Part IV credit. Learn about Tobacco Use and Pregnancy from CDCs Division of Reproductive Health.
In this toolkit, you will find tactics to help your community increase opportunities to be physically active.More specifically, the content will help you advocate for the creation of a state shared use initiative tohelp schools keep their doors open during non-school hours—which includes requirements forincentives, monitoring, and reporting of local shared use, as well as creation of an advisory body. Voicesfor Healthy Kids is excited to offer this toolkit—as well as several others—to support communitiesstriving to live, learn, and play in healthy environments.
In this toolkit, you will find tactics to help children in your community live safer, more physically activelives and, more specifically, to advocate for state policies that promote Safe Routes to School programsand infrastructure. Voices for Healthy Kids is excited to offer this toolkit – as well as several others – tosupport communities striving to live, learn and play in healthy environments.This toolkit developed by American Heart Association includes a comprehensive guide, fact sheets, and promotional materials.
In this toolkit, you will find tactics to help your community increase opportunities to be physically active.More specifically, the content will help you advocate for changes that can enable community membersto use school facilities such as gyms, fields, and playgrounds. Existing liability laws often prevent sucheasy, shared use. Clarifying these laws can encourage more schools to open playgrounds and gyms totheir communities during non-school hours. States can also provide incentive and monitoring programsthat encourage wide adoption of shared use strategies. This toolkit focuses on clarifying liability; acompendium toolkit, which details tactics and messaging for incentives and local shared agreements isalso available. Voices for Healthy Kids is excited to offer this toolkit—as well as several others—tosupport communities striving to live, learn and play in healthy environments.
The Safe Routes to School Policy Workbook is designed to help school board members, administrators, families of students, and community members create and implement policies that support active transportation and Safe Routes to School programs. The workbook will walk you through a series of policy options to help you build your own customized Safe Routes to School policy, which you can download and use in your community.
Online resource with detailed information about evidence-based policies and programs to reduce tobacco use and increase physical activity in communities. Created by the HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research and Partnership for Prevention, with input from the National Commission on Prevention Priorities, and utilizing interventions recommended by Community Preventive Services Task Force, Community Health Advisor was designed with public health leaders and policymakers in mind, and provides customizable, detailed information for improving population health.
In the Road Signs Pedcast (a “walking podcast”), you’ll hear from people on the ground who are building safe and active streets. Each episode discusses one transportation tool that promotes community health. In this first episode, learn about an approach to making existing streets safer—a road diet—with a story from Oakland, California.
A wide array of tools exists for measuring different features of the built environment, many of them well validated. However, it is often difficult for state and local program staff and evaluators to know which features of the built environment are most important to measure and which tool(s) to use to assess those features. The recently released CDC Built Environment Assessment Tool was designed to alleviate some of these challenges. The built environment includes the physical makeup of where we live, learn, work, and play—our homes, schools, businesses, streets and sidewalks, open spaces, and transportation options. The built environment can influence overall community health and individual behaviors such as physical activity and healthy eating.
The Parks, Trails, and Health Workbook A Tool for Planners, Parks and Recreational Professionals, and Health Practitioners is quick guide for incorporating public health considerations in the development and improvement of a park or trail. This tool can help start collaborative discussions about the health benefits of parks and trails and prepare for a health impact assessment (HIA).
This Rural Active Living Assessment (RALA) Tools has been designed to help you collect data on physical environment features and amenities, town characteristics, community programs, and policies that could potentially influence levels of physical activity among residents in your community. This tool will allow you to assess the “friendliness” of your community for walking, biking, and playing (especially among youth). It provides a structure for looking at the town as a whole, how it is laid out, where people live, work and go to school, and how they are likely to get from one place to another. It also includes a detailed tool to look at specific “segments” of your community and assess key characteristics of those segments. Finally, it also provides a structure for assessing the programs and policies that might help to overcome an “unfriendly” environment, or that might actually make that environment less activity friendly.
Six 1-hour workshops were developed, based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 and 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Each workshop includes a lesson plan, learning objectives, talking points, hands-on activities, videos, and handouts. The workshops are designed for community educators, health promoters, dietitians/nutritionists, cooperative extension agents, and others to teach to adults in a wide variety of community settings.
The CDC Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity’s Data, Trends and Maps online tool allows you to search for and view indicators related to nutrition, physical activity and obesity. You can search on the basis of a specific location or an indicator.
Childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and tripled in adolescents in the past 30 years. Diets high in calories, fat and sugars are contributing to this epidemic. Most of the food and beverages marketed to youth is unhealthy. Marketing is effective, influencing what children and adolescents want to eat and drink. Here is information to help get you started to combat the advertising efforts of the food and beverage industry, organizations and individuals can take action.
Active Living By Design (ALBD) developed its initial Community Action Model (CAM) and “5P” strategies (Preparation, Promotion, Programs, Policy and Physical Projects) as an evidence-informed framework for increasing active living and healthy eating in communities through comprehensive and integrated strategies. It served as the basis for ALBD’s work with communities and funders as they implemented bold new approaches to create healthier policies and environments.
online resource with detailed information about evidence-based policies and programs to reduce tobacco use and increase physical activity in communities. Created by the HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research and Partnership for Prevention, with input from the National Commission on Prevention Priorities, and utilizing interventions recommended by Community Preventive Services Task Force, Community Health Advisor was designed with public health leaders and policymakers in mind, and provides customizable, detailed information for improving population health.
Healthy food financing initiatives attract investment in underserved communities by providing criticalloan and grant financing. These resources help healthy food retailers overcome the higher initial barriersto entry into underserved, low-income urban and rural communities, and support renovation andexpansion of existing stores so they can provide the healthy foods that communities want and need.This toolkit developed by American Heart Association on healthy food financing includes a comprehensive guide, fact sheets, promotional materials and more.
In many urban and rural communities, corner stores, convenience stores, bodegas and gas stations are the only nearby places to buy food. But small food stores commonly sell highly processed foods that are high in fat and low in nutrients. For that reason, health advocates across the country are encouraging corner store operators to sell healthier foods, such as fresh fruits and vegetables.This toolkit developed by American Heart Association includes a comprehensive guide, fact sheets, and promotional materials.